Full text: Bacon, Francis: Sylva sylvarum

Natural Hiſtory; ſtance of their Leaves, and the Pedicles of them. And the cauſe of that again,
is, either the tough and viſcous Juyce of the Plant, or the ſtrength and heat
thereof. Of the firſt ſort, is Holly; which is of ſo viſcous a Juyce, as they
make Birdlime of the Bark of it. The Stalk of Ivy is tough, and not ſragile,
as we ſee it in other ſmall Twigs dry. Firr yieldeth Pitch. Box is a faſt and heavy
Wood, as we ſee it in Bowls. Eugh is a ſtrong and tough Wood, as we ſee it
in Bows. Of the ſecond ſort, is Juniper, which is a Wood odorate, and maketh
a hot Fire. Bays is likewiſe a hot and aromatical Wood, and ſo is Roſemary for
a Shrub. As for the Leaves, their denſity appeareth in that, either they are
ſmooth and ſhining, as in Bays, Holly, Ivy, Box, & c. or in that they are hard and
ſpiry, as in the reſt. And tryal would be made of Grafting of Roſemary, and
Bays, and Box, upon a Holly Stock, becauſe they are Plants that come all Winter. It were good to try it alſo with Graſts of other Trees, either Fruit trees, or
Wild-trees, to ſee whether they will not yield their Fruit, or bear their Leaves
later, and longer in the Winter; becauſe the Sap of the Holly putteth forth
moſt in the Winter. It may be alſo a Mezerion-tree grafted upon a Holly, will
prove both an earlier, and a greater Tree.

29.1.

592.

There be ſome Plants that bear no Flower, and yet bear Fruit; there be
ſome that bear Flowers, and no Fruit; there be ſome that bear neither
Flowers nor Fruit. Moſt of the great Timber-trees, (as Oaks, Beeches, & c.) bear no apparent Flowers; ſome few (likewiſe) of the Fruit-trees, as Mul-
berry, Walnuts, & c. And ſome Shrubs, (as Juniper, Holly, & c.) bear no
Flowers. Divers Herbs alſo bear Seeds, (which is as the Fruit,) and yet bear
no Flowers, as Purſlane, & c. Thoſe that bear Flowers, and no Fruit, are few,
as the double Cherry, the Sallow, & c. But for the Cherry, it is doubtſul,
whether it be not by Art or Culture; for if it be by Art, then tryal would be
made, whether Apples and other Fruits Bloſſoms may not be doubled. There
are ſome few, that bear neither Fruit, nor Flower; as the Elm, the Poplars,
Box, Braks, & c.

29.1.

593.

There be ſome Plants that ſhoot ſtill upwards, and can ſupport them-
ſelves, as the greateſt part of Trees and Plants: There be ſome other, that
creep along the Ground, or wind about other Trees, or props, and cannot
ſupport themſelves; as Vines, Ivy, Bryar, Briony, Wood-bines, Hops,
Climatis, Camomil, & c. The cauſe is, (as hath been partly touched) for that
all Plants, (naturally) move up wards; but if the Sap put up too faſt, it maketh
a ſlender Stalk, which will not ſupport the weight; and therefore theſe latter. ſort are all ſwift and haſty comers.

29.1.

594.

THe firſt and moſt ordinary help is Stercoration. The Sheeps-dung is one of
the beſt; and next, the Dung of Kine; and thirdly, that of Horſes; which is held to be ſome what too hot, unleſs it be mingled; that of Pigeons
for a Garden, as a ſmall quantity of Ground, excelleth. The ordering of
Dung is, if the Ground be Arable, to ſpred it immediately before the Plough-
ing and Sowing, and ſo to Plough it in: For if you ſpred it long before, the
Sun will draw out much of the fatneſs of the Dung: If the Ground be Grazing
Ground, to ſpred it ſomewhat late to wards Winter, that the Sun may have
the leſs power to dry it up. As for ſpecial Composts for Gardens (as a Hot Bed, & c.) we have handled them before.

29.1.

595.
Experiments
in Conſort,
touching all
Manner of
Compoſts and
Help of
Ground.

The ſecond kinde of Compoſt is, the ſpreding of divers kindes of Earth; as Marl, Chalk, Sea Sand, Earth upon Earth, Pond-Earth, and the mixtures of
them. Marl is thought to be the beſt, as having moſt fatneſs. And not

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