Full text: Bacon, Francis: Sylva sylvarum

The Hiſtory of Life and Death. in their own ſociety, do enjoy themſelves, and betake themſelves into their proper
Centre.

58.1.

61.

For theſe, if you recollect thoſe things which were formerly ſet down, as Subor-
dinates to Opium and Nitre, there will need no other Inquiſition.

58.1.

61.

As for the quieting of the unrulineſs of the Spirits, we ſhall preſently ſpeak of that,
when we enquire touching their Motion. Now then, ſeeing we have ſpoken of that
Condenſation of the Spirits which pertaineth to their ſubſtance, we will come to the
temper of Heat in them.

58.1.

62.

The Heat of the Spirits, as we ſaid, ought to be of that kind that it may be robuſt,
not eager, and may delight rather to maſter the tough and obſtinate, than to carry away
the thin and light humors.

58.1.

63.

We muſt beware of Spices, wine, and ſtrong Drinks, that our uſe of them be very
temperate, and ſometimes diſcontinued; alſo of Savory, Wild marjoram, Penny-royal,
and all ſuch as bite and heat the tongue; for they yield unto the Spirits an heat not O-
perative, but Predatory.

58.1.

64.

Theſe yield a robuſt heat, eſpecially Elecampane, Garlick, Carduus Benedictus,
Water-creßes while they are young, Germander, Angelica, Zedoary, Vervin, Valerian,
Myrrhe, Pepper-wort, Elder flowers, Garden-Chervile; [?] The uſe of theſe things with
choice and judgement, ſometimes in Sallads, ſometimes in Medicines, will ſatisfie this
Operation.

58.1.

65.

It falls out well that the Grand Opiates will alſo ſerve excellently for this Operation,
in reſpect that they yield ſuch an heat by compoſition, which is wiſhed, but not to be
found, in Simples. For the mixing of thoſe exceſſive hot things (ſuch as are En [?] phor-
bium, Pellitory of Spain, stavis-acre, Dragon-wort, Anacordi, caſtoreum, Ariſtolochium,
Opponax, Ammoniachum, Galbanum, and the like, which of themſelves cannot be taken
inwardly) to qualifie and abate the Stupefactive virtue of the Opium, they do make
ſuch a conſtitution of a Medicament as we now require; which is excellently ſeen in
this, That Treacle and Methridate, and the reſt, are not ſharp, nor bite the tongue,
but are onely ſomewhat bitter, and of ſtrong ſcent, and at laſt manifeſt their heat when
they come into the ſtomach, and in their ſubſequent operations.

58.1.

66.

There conduce alſo to the robuſt heat of the Spirits Venus often excited, rarely
performed; and no leſs ſome of the affections, of which ſhall be ſpoken hereafter. So touching the heat of the Spirits, Analogical to the prolongation of Life, thus
much.

58.1.

67.

Touching the Quantity of the Spirits, that they be not exuberant and boiling, but
rather sparing, and within a mean, (ſeeing a ſmall flame doth not devour ſo much as a
great flame) the Inquiſition will be ſhort.

58.1.

68.

It ſeems to be approved by experience, that a spare Diet, and almoſt a Pythagori-
cal, ſuch as is either preſcribed by the ſtrict Rules of a Monastical life, or practiſed
by Hermites, which have Neceſſity and Poverty for their Rule, rendreth a man long-
liv’d.

58.1.

69.

Hitherto appertain drinking of water, a hard Bed, abſtinence from Fire, a ſlender
Diet, (as namely, of Herbs, Fruits, Fleſh, and Fiſh, rather powdred and ſalted than
freſh and hot) an Hair-ſhirt, frequent Faſtings, frequent Watchings, few ſenſual Plea-
ſures, and ſuch like; for all theſe diminiſh the Spirits, and reduce them to ſuch a quan-
tity as may be ſuffi [?] cient onely for the Functions of Life, whereby the depredation is the
leſs.

58.1.

70.

But if the Diet ſhall not be altogether ſo rigorous and mortifying, yet notwithſtand-
ing ſhall be always equal and conſtant to it ſelf, it worketh the ſame effect. We ſee
it in Flames, that a Flame ſomewhat bigger (ſo it be always alike and quiet) conſu-
meth leſs of the fuel than a leſſer Flame blown with Bellows, and by Guſts ſtronger
or weaker: That which the Regiment and Diet of Cornarus the Venetian ſhewed
plainly, who did eat and drink ſo many years together by a juſt weight, where-
by he exceeded an hundred years of age, ſtrong in limbs, and intire in his
ſenſes.

58.1.

71.

Care alſo muſt be taken, that a body plentifully nouriſhed, and not emaciated by
any of theſe aforeſaid Diets, omitteth not a ſeaſonable uſe of Venus, leſt the Spirits in-
creaſe too faſt, and ſoften and deſtroy the body. So then, touching a moderate quan-
tity of Spirits, and (as we may ſay) Frugal, thus much.

58.1.

72.

The Inquiſition touching bridling the motions of the Spirits followeth next.

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