Full text: Wilkins, John: A discovery of a new world

That the Moon may be a World. every one of them is allotted to a ſeveral Orb,
and not altogether in one, as the fixed Stars
ſeem to be. But this would be too much for
to vent at the firſt: the chief thing at which
I now aim in this Diſcourſe, is to prove that
there may be one in the Moon.

It hath been before confirm’d, that there
was a Sphere of thick vaporous Air encom-
paſſing the Moon, as the firſt and ſecond
Regions do this Earth. I have now ſhewed,
that thence ſuch Exhalations may pro-
ceed as do produce the Comets: Now from
hence it may probably follow, that there may
be Wind alſo and Rain, with ſuch other Me-
teors, as are common amongſt us. This Con-
ſequence is ſo dependent, that Fromondus dares
not deny it, though he would (as he confeſſes
himſelf) for if the Sun be able to exhale from
them ſuch Fumes as may cauſe Comets, why
not ſuch as may cauſe Winds, why not then
ſuch alſo as may cauſe Rain, ſince I have above
ſhewed, that there is Sea and Land, as with
us ? Now Rain ſeems to be more eſpecially
requiſite for them, ſince it may allay the Heat
and Scorchings of the Sun, when he is over
their Heads. And Nature hath thus provided
for thoſe in Peru, with the Other Inhabitants
under the Line.

41.1.

De meteor.
l. 3. c. 23
Art. 6.

But if there be ſuch great and frequent Al-
terations in the Heavens, why cannot we dif-
cern them ?

I Anſwer:

1. There may be ſuch, and we not able to
perceive them, becauſe of the weakneſs of
our Eye, and the diſtance of thoſe places from

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